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SMSFs and cryptocurrencies

Posted on 23 March '18 by admin

Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies have become increasingly popular over the past few years. As many keen investors jump on board, the ATO is reminding SMSFs to be aware of the tax consequences.

Cryptocurrencies are classified as capital gains tax (CGT) assets, therefore, upon their disposal they may be subject to capital gains tax (CGT).

It is essential to keep records of cryptocurrency transactions within a SMSF such as acquiring and disposing a cryptocurrency.

An investment within a SMSF must:
– Be allowed under the trust deed
– Be in accordance with the investment strategy of the fund
– Comply with SISA and SISR regulatory requirements

When an SMSF invests in a cryptocurrency it must follow the same regulatory requirements that apply to investments in other assets. For example, super laws pertaining valuation, ownership and separation of assets, related party transactions, pension or benefit payments, sole-purpose test and voluntary disclosures apply to all cryptocurrency transactions.

Employers urged to act now for Single Touch Payroll

Posted on 23 March '18 by admin

The Australian Tax Office (ATO) is urging employers with 20 or more employees to prepare for the introduction of Single Touch Payroll.

Single Touch Payroll will be introduced from 1 July 2018, requiring employers to report their employee’s tax and super information to the ATO through Single Touch Payroll approved software.

Employers will report each time they pay their employees, i.e., weekly, fortnightly or monthly. The information that will be reported includes withholding amounts, superannuation liability information or ordinary times earnings (OTE) and salary, wages, allowances and deductions.

Single Touch Payroll will provide greater transparency and connect businesses to the ATO through their existing software.

Employers must prepare by organising the following:

Employers with 19 or less employees have until 1 July 2019 to prepare, however they can start reporting as soon as their software is updated.

Eligibility for the downsizer measure

Posted on 16 March '18 by admin

As of 1 July 2018, the Government will introduce a new measure that allows the contribution of up to $300,000 of proceeds from downsizing a home to be added to superannuation.

The new measure will benefit those aged 65 years and over, provided they meet certain eligibility rules including:

Tax tips for property investors

Posted on 16 March '18 by admin

Property investors can access a wide range of tax deductions and items subject to depreciation for their rental property yet many miss out on unknown tax breaks, foregoing an average of $20,000 a year on a $1 million house.

Here are four ways to maximise your tax deductions while complying with the tax office:

Use a quantity surveyor

Registered quantity surveyors can establish the value of purchased items and building construction costs by preparing depreciation schedules to maximise an investor’s claim.

Items as diverse as kitchen equipment, bathroom fittings, outdoor furniture, air conditioning and swimming pools are all legitimate claims. A quantity surveyor will ensure valuations of the items in the building are at market value, avoiding the need to explain any valuations that are higher than expected to the ATO.

The cost of using a quantity surveyor is also tax deductible.

Apportion expenses

It is common for investors to bundle a mix of properties under one single loan, i.e. the family home and a rental property may be funded by the same mortgage and expenses apportioned accordingly. However, having separate loans can increase deductions as the non-deductible debt can be paid down or even better linked to an offset account, with the deductible loan having full interest paid and claimed.

Immediate write-offs

An immediate write-off applies to items worth less than $300 and can be claimed in the current income year. Items such as garden gnomes, kitchen cutlery and ironing boards, irons are easily forgotten and all can be written off in the first year.


Construction costs can generally be ­depreciated at 2.5 per cent each year over 40 years for residential properties built after July 1985. This entitlement passes from one owner to the next whenever the property is sold. A quantity surveyor can provide an estimate if information is not available.

Many high value household items are now deducted using the “diminishing value method”, which means the most depreciation happens in the first few years. For example, ducted heating worth $4941 would have a first-year deduction of $493, rising to $2022 over the first five years.

Adding items such as solar lights, garbage bins, garden sheds, intercom systems and closed-circuit television systems to a low-value pool can open up ways to depreciate items at a higher rate, therefore, increasing immediate returns.

Setting up your SMSF correctly

Posted on 9 March '18 by admin

Setting up your self-managed super fund can be a daunting process; you want to ensure you are covering all legal requirements throughout the process.

The Australian Taxation Office has outlined steps to take when setting up your SMSF to ensure you are eligible for tax concessions, able to receive contributions and looked after if a trustee is unable or decides they no longer wish to be the active trustee.

When setting up your SMSF, you ought to consider the following:

Should you follow all of these steps, the SMSF you are setting up will be compliant with SMSF regulations. Once these aspects are considered, you need to make sure all SMSF trustees are compliant with super and tax laws. These laws are often being updated, so staying educated on current compliance issues is paramount to the success of the SMSF.

Work-related expenses

Posted on 9 March '18 by admin

The Australian Taxation Office is continuing to pay close attention to claims made as ‘work-related expenses’ throughout 2018.

Making incorrect claims of work-related deductions can land you in hot water with the ATO, and thus it is important you can justify these claims. In order to claim correctly, you must be able to show that:

If you are making a claim for an expense that you use for both business and privately, you may only claim the portion of the expense that was related to business.

Common SMSF mistakes to avoid

Posted on 5 March '18 by admin

Running a self-managed super fund can be a great strategy for your super and your retirement, provided you manage it correctly.

To ensure you can enjoy the later stages of life and retire comfortably, you will need to be aware of common SMSF mistakes and how to avoid them.

Record keeping

Bad record keeping when it comes to SMSFs is very common and very problematic. If the ATO decides to look into your SMSF and your record keeping is subpar, you and the rest of the members of the fund could land themselves in hot water. Good record keeping practices are a great preventative measure for being liable for fines and penalties should the ATO choose to investigate the fund. It is also a great habit to get into as proper documentation makes all decision making regarding your fund much more legitimate.

Financial assistance or loans to members

By law, you cannot loan or offer financial assistance to a member of the self-managed super fund at any time, either directly or indirectly. Many members entertain the mindset that because it is their money, they can allocate loans to other members and to themselves, but this is not the case. Should the ATO catch a member of an SMSF doing this, they will face harsh penalties. They may also lose all concessional tax benefits, which impacts the whole fund and not just the guilty member.

Contribution cap

According to the Australian Taxation Office, if a member of a self-managed super fund makes a contribution or their contributions in any given financial year exceed the contribution caps, they may be liable for an additional tax on the excess contributions. As of 1 July 2017, the contribution cap for all members of an SMSF regardless of age is $25,000 which is taxed at a rate of 15 per cent. If members contribute over this amount, they could be taxed at 47 per cent on additional contributions.


For the most part, most mistakes or errors surrounding your SMSF and the management of the fund can be avoided if you and the other members in the fund educate themselves on rules, regulations and strategies to remain compliant. With the internet available virtually everywhere, you can always read up on and stay up to date with ways to run the SMSF effectively. Just beware of where you are getting your information from and ensure it is a trustworthy site. You can also always speak to your financial advisor for guidance and advice.

Tax deductible legal expenses

Posted on 5 March '18 by admin

While we like to think of business ventures as a platform to make money, there are also many expenses that will be incurred through running one.

Luckily, there are many tax deductions a business owner can claim when it comes to the expenses their business incurs, in particular their legal expenses. Understanding what these tax deductible expenses are and how to apply for these deductions appropriately can see you save a considerable amount of money, which can be transformed into profit.

Specific expenses incurred will or won’t be deductible depending on whether the expenditure is capital, domestic or private in nature. The following expenses are not deductible under regular legal expense deductions, due to being either capital or private in nature. Deductions can be claimed under a separate provision. These include:

The circumstances in which legal fees incurred can be easily deducted for tax purposes, provided the correct procedure is followed and appropriate criteria is met, include the following:

Tax deductions on the above listed legal expenses are a guide, and will be determined on a case by case basis, depending on the specific circumstances relating to each case.

There are also a number of situations in which legal expenses are commonly incurred and are not tax deductible, including the following:

The ATO sets out clear guidelines of the appropriate documentation needed in order to claim deductions from legal expenses. Generally, documentation needed includes:

The in’s and out’s of asset allocation

Posted on 23 February '18 by admin

Deciding where to allocate your assets can be confusing and even daunting, particularly if you aren’t confident in your knowledge of the current financial sphere.

Consider the following in’s and out’s of asset allocation to make the process much easier:

Set goals

Goal-setting is extremely important, particularly when it comes to your money. When deciding out where to allocate assets, you should set both short-term and long-term goals. If you are planning to save for a vacation or a new car, this would be a short-term goal, a mortgage would be a medium-term goal and your nest egg would be a long-term financial goal. The goals you set should be SMART; specific, measurable, achievable, realistic and timely. You should also revisit your SMART goals and assess how well you are doing, thus allowing you to make appropriate adjustments if need be.


The more open an individual is to risk, the greater the opportunities for where they allocate their assets. If an individual is open to investing in higher-risk assets, they can consider options such as investing in shares. If they are more attracted to low-risk assets, options such as a term deposit are more suitable.

Speak to a professional

If you make it known to friends and family that you are deciding where to allocate your assets, you will become inundated with tips and advice of what and where you need to invest. This can become overwhelming and more of a hindrance than a help. The best person you can talk to is a professional you trust, such as your financial advisor. They will be able to give you all the information you need, they will be able to answer all your questions, and they will be unbiased.

The ATO targeting record keeping of small businesses

Posted on 23 February '18 by admin

The Australian Tax Office is honing in on small businesses failing to comply with guidelines regarding appropriate record keeping.

Findings from the ATO’s Protecting Honest Business campaign indicated that one of the leading factors for small business failure is their poor record keeping practices. Small business owners are required to disclose particular information, and keep records of the following:

By law, all Australian businesses must keep these records for a period of five years. These records must be in writing, either on paper or electronically. Dedicating time each week, fortnight or month to compile all the above-listed information will prevent you incurring fines and possibly losing your business.

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